theindiancritic's Activity (12)

  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic's movie review was featured in Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse.
    **NO CRITICAL SPOILERS** This movie is a revolution in the world of animated films. In an industry where so many aesthetics of different movies feel the same, there is little variety in the actual animation style big (and really bad, mainstream) studios such as Dreamworks and Illumination keep churning out. Films like Into the Spider-Verse show how much potential the animation medium still has left to uncover as a whole. By adopting a comic book theme, appropriate to the universe of Spider-Man, Into the Spider-Verse has a specific animation style consisting of not just wonderful character designs that seem realistic and stylized at the same time, but also lots of cut frames that make the action seem less fluid so that it actually looks like transitioning pages in a comic book. (Technically speaking, the film runs at 12fps instead of the standard 24 for snappier poses so it looks like a comic book.) And it's not just the animation; this movie excels in so many other aspects. It's one of the most innovative Spider-Man films to come out in recent times, completely removing Spider-Man himself from the role of the protagonist, replacing him with Miles Morales, a protagonist that comes across as exceedingly fresh, especially after being fatigued with so many pieces of Peter Parker media. The other characters are interesting, too. Peter Parker from the alternate universe is equally as interesting, representing a failed version of the hero that we had known to come and love. He manages to be equally as entertaining as the original, with an added, almost permanent dry sarcasm to his voice with every joke, signifying that he is perfectly conscious of his traits and has accepted his identity as a failure. And it raises so many interesting questions. What would've happened if this Peter Parker that we had come to know for so long had given up on life? What if he didn't have the strength to get back up and fight? This movie addresses that motif along similar lines. Gwen is also similarly interesting enough, and while she does have her own backstory, she isn't given as much screen time, and it looks as though part of her character was scrapped halfway through development. It doesn't matter, though, because, as Spider-Woman, with striking character design, she symbolizes a fresh perspective in this superhero world. She's really entertaining to watch on screen, and the chemistry she shares with Miles Morales proves to be convincing. The other Spider-People, involving a black-and-white WWII based crime detective, an anime girl from the next millennium (as an avid anime consumer, I find this reference to be absolutely wonderful), and even a cartoon news-reporting pig, are all great as characters, but never expanded to their full potential, and it's fine. Miles Morales' screen time is already being stolen enough. However, they have striking and amazing character designs that are absolutely unforgettable. The crime detective's got a black-and-white theme that becomes a running gag, the anime girl looks fantastic as a 2D character integrated into a 3D world, and the pig has cartoony squash-and-stretch animation that's a joy to watch on screen. Miles' uncle is an absolute phenomenon. He has a very important and involved role that makes the stakes feel so much more personal. Speaking of personal. Kingpin as the villain is absolutely fantastic, just fleshed out enough to be a villain, and though he has a tragic backstory, the film doesn't try to make that an excuse for his actions, and that's why he works so well as a character. (Dogo won't let me write much more.) The lighting, backgrounds, music, themes, and literally every other piece of this film is fantastic, but there's so much more to expand on, and the film warrants for a sequel. Do I care about its supposedly glaring flaws that other reviewers went to such lengths to show? No. Do yourself a favor and don't hold a bias against this film just because it's PG and animated. Watch it. 5/5.
    28 days ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic's book review was featured in Dragon Pearl.
    *NO CRITICAL SPOILERS* (Entirely subjective) Dragon Pearl is about a fantasy world taking place in space. And yes, I picked it up because it said, "Rick Riordan Presents" on the cover. In this world, humans coexist with "supernaturals" in space and the summary above pretty much gives the rest of the synopsis. A critical review: Kim Min is the protagonist of the book. As far as characters go, she's one of the most interesting in the whole book. The idea of a supernatural fox-pseudo human going to space to save her brother while is such an enticing premise that is fully realized in this book. She possesses many shades of grey that make the reader question her moral values and the decisions she makes, going so far as to have them decide whether she can even be considered a good character in the first place. She is determined, rebellious, and willing to do anything, even abuse her shapeshifting abilities to pose as another individual. She deceives her closest friends and infiltrates a private room to find information about where her brother (the main motive) has gone. The reader's choice to decide whether or not she can be forgiven gives the book a more immersive feel to it and makes her character more relatable. The most interesting thing about her is her grey shades that leave the reader One of the book's biggest strengths is its worldbuilding elements. The world itself is full of supernatural creatures and is so fully realized it feels almost real. Part of the reason for this is the fact that it's able to reflect real-world prejudices in a realistic manner that mirrors prejudices of our own. In this book, fox species are frowned upon as deceptive and cunning, and while it's a nice nod to Zootopia (ha), it manages to be different from that with its sci-fi theming and setting that takes place in the confines of a military-like spaceship. The Korean mythology that is implemented in this futuristic setting feels so incredibly creative and mind-blowing at times, as the parallels between the legends and the events of the book are so cleverly executed. However, there are some serious criticisms that I feel should be addressed about this book. The book seems to drag on and on forever and is riddled with poor pacing. Lots of patience is needed to go through this book as the "high-octane thrills" that are promised on the cover only come occasionally. This is likely due to the setting, which is restricted within the spaceship. Although Kim Min has lots of drive behind her, the rate at which the goals themselves are accomplished sometimes happens at a staggeringly slow pace. The characters spend lots of their time expressing their opinions on previous events in the book or spend a long time contemplating what to do. And when the destination is finally reached, it doesn't feel fulfilling. The brother Kim spends so many pages looking for is actually in the book for only twenty pages/ The first and last act of the book is where it truly manages to shine as that's where it feels most appropriately paced. Some side plots also unnecessarily intrude in the main story. Kim's two best friends, Haneul and Sujin, are not expanded to their full potential and while they start off strong, get less and less developed as the book drags on. The villain also feels one-dimensional at times, with the generic "I'll take over the world using this epic powerful item" trope. Even Jun, Kim's brother, struggles as a character with the same problems and lack of a proper arc. Jang, the ghost out for revenge, is the only other character that actually feels fleshed out enough. Overall, this book is good. That much is true. It has a fully-realized world and protagonist that is hindered by poor pacing and side characters. But hey. That's just my opinion. If you're patient, go enough and read it. 3/5.
    About 1 month ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic's book review was featured in Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer.
    Although the book progresses mostly on a lighter note, “Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer” focuses the spotlight on many taboo subjects for young adult novels. With central topics like feminism, racism, illegal immigration, political outbreaks, drug abuse, and child abuse, John Grisham manages to effectively prod at touchy subjects with so much subtlety within each subplot, that even with lots of murder, smoking, and court cases scattered throughout the plot, through the eyes of thirteen-year-old Theodore Boone, “Kid Lawyer” is surprisingly appropriate. And with all of these dark themes, it comes as no surprise that there is indeed a lot to learn in this book. Each subplot takes the reader into a new and unexplored road, and although a suspenseful cliffhanger is presented towards the end of the book, the author still manages to quietly tie all of these themes up. This results in the reader feeling like they’ve actually read a complete book instead of a book with several different subplots, although that is precisely how it feels while reading it. John Grisham’s “Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer” is many different things. Sometimes it’s a fight for justice, sometimes it’s a heart-wrenching story of family situation infused with drug and child abuse, sometimes it’s a guidebook on the court’s rules, and sometimes it’s about a murder-witnessing illegal immigrant’s unwillingness to provide the town with justice for fear of getting caught in the middle.
    10 months ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic's book review was featured in Heat.
    The “No-Neck”, fire hydrant-shaped yet graceful, loyal, chatterbox, (drum roll), Manny, is by far my most favorite character in the book. He’s been sent by the angels to help Michael in Michael’s dark times of distress. Michael knows that a world without Manny is like pizza without the cheese. If Manny weren’t there for Michael, what would become of him? They do everything together, and Manny is willing to do anything for Michael. What more could a friend want than Manny? He’s a very relatable character; you’ve probably got one of these Manny’s in your life. One reason specifically why I like Manny so much is because he’s a lot like me. We’re both huge chatterboxes and crack jokes in unnecessary situations. He’s the finishing masala to the book, which of course would never be complete with Manny. “Heat” without Manny would be a heart-wrenching tragedy story, with Michael constantly under clouds. The comedy factor combined with the drama is what makes “Heat” so special, and Manny is the definition of comedy, of course. He’ll lift his head up in the darkest of situations and is always by Michael’s side. Neither of them knows it, but deep down they are as close as brothers, Manny only being second to baseball for Michael.
    Over 1 year ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic's book review was featured in Wonder.
    An emotional roller coaster that takes you along the journey of a boy who was, because of medical problems, born with a deformed face. The difficulties he faces, especially seen on-screen, are heart-wrenching, and sometimes people make fun of him so much he wants to cry. But he barely has any private place to break down like that. The journey for him is very difficult, but somehow he finds way in the path full of thorns. He's an ordinary kid with an extraordinary face, but that won't stop him from winning everyone's hearts in the end. Though he is challenged with the difficulties of having a deformed face, can he still emerge a hero, a lovable protagonist? This is one of the best books I have ever read. The cover may be dull, but you definitely want to give this book a try. Hands-down, it's an unanimous 5/5.
    Over 1 year ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic's book review was featured in The Blood Of Olympus (The Heroes of Olympus, Book 5).
    The final battle. The one we've all been waiting for. Riordan once again does an absolutely, utterly fantastic job with giving the characters depth. The seven are all on board the Argo II, and are heading towards Rome to stop the end of the world. Jason, the blond Superman whose mother died when he was two, and went missing from his family that included Thalia Grace. His character isn't as fleshed out as the others, but what we do know: He's afraid of breaking the rules, doing the wrong thing that will eventually cause the end of the world. We can all relate to this; Jason is perfection that has taken on a human form. Percy, all of our faves. the one we know most, has played as a pawn for the Gods Of Olympus like Jason. After losing his memory thanks to Hera, he is part of the huge plan to unite the two camps. His fatal flaw is not being able to let his friends take a blow, and this will cost him soon enough. He wants nothing more than to enjoy a quiet life with Annabeth, but it looks like the Fates have a different idea in mind for him. Although he has lots of boiling emotions inside, he hides it with all of that slapstick humor on the outside. Which brings us to Leo. He's the dude that could possibly become the new favorite, constantly cracking jokes, building things, and making awesome tacos. He has a dark past, too. His mother died in a fire when he was young, and he has always felt resentment and hate against the Fates for that. But you couldn't possibly tell, with all of the constant wisecrackers he dishes out. He may be scrawny and a little too obsessed with mechanics, but in the end, he's a very lovable character. But he's the 7th wheel. He'll never be able to fit in, and that is what disturbs him a lot during the mission. Frank, the shapeshifter, the clumsy dude with the baby face. Looking at him, you wouldn't think that he's been through that much, but his mom died at war when he was small. Also, his life depends on a stick. That's what you get for being able to shapeshift like the definition of awesomeness. Annabeth is the wise girl, the tactician of the team. She ran away from her house at seven, and has constantly gotten more powerful and wiser since then. Only second to building and architecture than Leo, is able to get absorbed into the laptop Daedalus himself had given her, and like Percy, just wants to spend a quiet life with him. She's really annoyed at Hera for taking Percy away, and her resentment may be a danger to the team later. Hazel has been given a second chance at life and intends to use it to the fullest. But rescuing the world might mean dying again, and she is afraid of this. She's a brave warrior, nevertheless, with a sick cussing supersonic horse that can reach the speed of sound. Piper, the girl whose ashamed of her heritage. She never wanted to be a daughter of Aphrodite, and tries to downplay her beauty with eccentric styles. However, there's more to her story than just that. The world is at risk of ending, and everything she'd ever known and loved would be gone. And the fact that she can't exactly fight is also what she thinks makes her a misfit on her team. All she has is a charming voice, a blade that shows gruesome scenes, and a cornucopia that is hardly worthy of respect. She's afraid of failing her team, and not being able to participate the right way. And Nico, the 8th. He isn't exactly a part of their mission but he will be helping Reyna and Coach Hedge transport a mad golden statue, the Athena Parthenos, across the Atlantic, using his power of shadow travel. He's in danger of fading away, but he doesn't care what happens to him as long as he's able to save the world. Reyna, the girl that has experienced a lot of heartbreak. Hera transported Jason to the other camp without warning when she was trying to get him. And Percy turned her down when she proposed. "No demigod shall heal your heart", Aphrodite had said. And now she has to transport the Athena Parthenos across the Atlantic with Coach Hedge and Nico. But it's worth sacrificing her life to save the world. She is Roman to the core. And lastly, Coach Hedge, the violent satyr with a soft heart. His wife, a cloud nymph, is pregnant, and he is ready to save the world, no matter what comes in his way. All of these demigods (and a satyr) area brave group working to save the world together. They will do anything to save their precious world, even if it means sacrificing their lives. But will they also be able to stop the Romans in time as well as Gaea? Octavian poses a serious threat to them in addition to the Evil Mother Earth, and makes things even more difficult than anyone could have imagined. Riordan's best novel yet; it's a crackling page turner. Don't miss this one. 5/5!
    Over 1 year ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic's book review was featured in The Son Of Neptune (The Heroes of Olympus, Book 2).
    Riordan books run on emotion....this one is no different. Us readers are attracted to his books in the first place by the hilarious humor but with a backdrop of strong emotion. Each character has their own heartbreaking story to tell, and the past is what shapes their character. Percy would not have a significant role in the book if not for his memory loss, as the fact that he struggled forward to see Annabeth again made us want to cry. Frank would be nothing without his sad story and the witty theory Riordan came up with that if you are powerful, then your life depends on something delicate. Frank had a lot of heartbreak in his past; faced a level of sadness that the other demigods did not. He also had the power to turn into animals, which backfired on him because his life depended on a small piece of stick. If it was burned, he was dead. This lifeline is the leverage that Riordan used to develop the character and add emotion into the story. Hazel is dead. She has been given a second chance at life and the way she died makes you want to cry. The way Riordan has used these characters, developed their characters so we as readers could thoroughly enjoy the book, is completely unbelievable. When we read his books, we feel like we are the main character of the book. We can relate to this sadness, this heartbreak, and the depth in each individuals' characters is what makes this story shine. However, not just that, the breezy humor that covers up the drama and emotion is the most lovable part of the book. One will find themself laughing every five minutes as the journey continues through its fast-paced action. Action. That's another aspect of this book we love. The way they defeat the monsters, used their differences to conquer the evil is top-notch. The book never seems to lose pace and keeps us on our toes. As a reader, we want a roller coaster of emotions jam-packed into a book, and Riordan has packaged it perfectly in this novel yet again. Kudos, Mr. Riordan. Your books are our sanctuary to a key to a parallel universe of heroes who we can relate to. We love Riordan World.
    Over 1 year ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic added a book review.
    The story of a girl's life and how she overcomes her disability of being deaf. Her deafness is what drives the plot of the book. It is very touching and based on a true story. It is packed with so much emotion it makes you want to cry. And the author has achieved this range through the form of a graphic novel. Awesome!!
    Over 1 year ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancriticliked a comment in Aru Shah and the End of Time (A Pandava Novel Book 1) (Pandava Series).
    I love mythology. To be honest, Rick Riordan’s book made me love it. So when I saw this new “Rick Riordan Presents” ARC I had to request it. And based on the high demand on this particular ARC, I would say I got pretty lucky. ASATEOF was beautiful in many different ways. I was so excited to see that a middle grade mythology novel is based on Hindu mythology. #WENEEDMOREDIVERSEBOOKSINOURLIVES But, Aru Shah maybe, kind of had a bit of flaws. I shall now arrange this in a pros and cons order- PROS- What I really liked about this novel is the mythology. The Hindu mythology was something new to find in middle grade novels, AND I LOVED IT. The humor in Aru Shah was HILARIOUS! (Wow Lana, the humor was hilarious) There is something though….we’ll just leave it for the cons. The characters were really interesting. I l oved how Roshani Chokshi gave them different personalities. I loved them so much, I wished that I can just hop in and join them on their adventure. I really liked Aru. I loved how she was smart and adventurous. For a girl like Mini, Aru Shah was a perfect sister. Mini was so adorable. Her personality stood out from all the other characters from different books. Mini was truly special! CONS- This is going to be a really short list, so listen carefully… The jokes and references in this book were a bit exaggerated. Ok, I laughed at most of them, but in the middle of a fight, a joke irritates me. Oh! Another thing, the author says that Aru is feeling mad or sad, but she says something a mad person wouldn’t say. When you feel mad, do you usually crack a joke? I don’t think so. In all, I liked this book. There were a few “things” that really upset me. ASATEOF had a bright future, but had a bit of a rough trip. 3 stars from me! Not bad! I received an ARC from DogoBooks; this has not influenced my opinion.
    Over 1 year ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic added a book review.
    Story Thieves: The Stolen Chapters is a wonderful, fast-paced novel that leaves you breathless at almost every single twist. This book was written so that you can’t expect anything, and if you do, your expectations are wrong. This formula is perfect to execute a stunning climax over and over. This book may be a little overwhelming, and if you like simple plots only, this isn’t your kind of a book. It takes some processing to understand exactly what is happening. Ok, so the plot. This whole series is plot-driven, and that’s why it turns out to be such a success. It’s about three friends that we know from the last book: Owen, Bethany, and Kiel. owen and Kiel wake up in Owen’s library with no memory and massive headaches. Then, some random guy in a question mark mask comes up to them and tells them he’s fictional, Sherlock Holmes’ son Doyle Holmes, he knows Kiel’s fictional, blah, blah, blah. Your typical serial-killing intellect. He tells them to find their friend Bethany in two hours, or basically, he’ll wreck them and the world. He then proceeds to set the library on fire, forcing them out and on their way. How Owen and Kiel manage to find Bethany and how they proceed to destroy Doyle is the crux of the story. The plot may sound simple enough, but it’s really not. The mystery is based on a play of words, and Owen doesn’t realize that until the end, until his nemesis practically gives the answer away. No amount of predicting can be done to guess exactly how this story ends. No doubt, it is one of my favorite books. 5/5. You won’t be disappointed.
    Over 1 year ago

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